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The Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Borderline Patients

  • Otto F. Kernberg
Chapter

Abstract

Under the impact of new clinical experiences and empirical research in the last twenty years, the psychodynamic psychotherapy for borderline patients has evolved into a more exploratory, expressive direction. The supportive psychotherapy approaches that were formerly recommended as treatment of choice have been losing their appeal. Differences persist, however, regarding the extent to which the psychotherapy should be purely analytic, exploratory, or expressive, or should combine expressive and supportive features, at least in the initial stages of treatment.

Keywords

Object Representation Borderline Personality Disorder Psychotherapeutic Treatment Negative Transference External Reality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Otto F. Kernberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Cornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA

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