The Effects of Safety Regulations and Law Enforcement

  • Stefan Siegrist
  • Eva Roskova
Chapter

Abstract

There is no doubt about the relationship between breaking certain traffic laws and loss of health. Non-compliance with speed and alcohol limits is a major cause of road accidents at the individual as well as at group level (e.g., Evans, 1991). Experts estimate that reducing the average speed by 5 km/h causes fatal injuries to fall by 25%, and reducing driving with a blood-alcohol level (BAC) in excess of 0.5 parts per thousand results in a further reduction of 5–40% in fatalities (ETSC, 1997).

Keywords

Speed Limit Seat Belt Traffic Safety Apply Behaviour Analysis Road User 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Siegrist
    • 1
  • Eva Roskova
    • 2
  1. 1.Swiss Council for Accident Prevention bfuBerneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Comenius UniversitySlovakiaBratislava

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