Objectives, Topics and Methods

  • Talib Rothengatter
Chapter

Abstract

Traffic and transport sciences in a general sense concern the analysis, explanation and prediction of all manifestations which are related to the mobility of people and goods (Michon, 1989b). The transport system has many components (rail, road and air infrastructure vehicles) in which many actors (haulage companies, public transport providers, infrastructure planners, transport consumers) can act within certain limits of freedom (economics, traffic law and transport regulations). Psychology can contribute to the interdisciplinary traffic and transport sciences with its specific models, metaphors and methodolologies which are specific to its disciplinary approach. It can determine and predict what effects the possibilities and constraints of the transport system will have on the decision making processes of the actors, and, reversely, it can determine and predict what demands the actors will pose on the transport system components. Also it can determine and predict the consequences of the decisions made by these actors. For example, it may determine the effects of transport mode characteristics (e.g., time required to travel from A to B) on transport mode choice of the individual transport users or, alternatively, may determine the effects of transport mode choice on safety and environmental pollution. The psychological approach is in that respect complementary to the other traffic and transport sciences, such as engineering, planning and economics, and it shares their objectives, that is, to optimize the transport system in the sense of fulfilling transport demand with minimum damage to the environment and human life.

Keywords

Road Safety Traffic Safety Road User Haulage Company Route Guidance System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Talib Rothengatter
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Environmental and Traffic PsychologyUniversity of GroningenThe Netherlands

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