Symbolism of the Tower as Abjection

  • Inna Semetsky
Chapter

Summary

One of the most dramatic, horrifying and powerful images in the Tarot deck is the image of the Tower — trump # XVI — which in some decks is called The Tower of Destruction. This paper, employing the method of interpretive analytics, attempts to decipher the symbolism inscribed in the imagery of this card. What emerges as a result of interpretation is a two-fold hybrid of Kristeva’s (1982) theory of abjection and the Jungian and post-Jungian archetypal psychology. The paper also, focusing on both symbolic and semiotic features of the image, explores the conditions for the construction of subjectivity within a double process of negation and identification thus implicitly addressing the therapeutic implications of this card’s reading. The paper concludes, continuing the two-fold investigative approach, by expanding on the individual reading of the Tower and illustrating its meaning on the collective level as presented in a feminist tradition.

Keywords

Feminist Tradition Death Drive Mirror Stage Iconic Sign Violent Passion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inna Semetsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityColumbia

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