The Dialectic of Critique, Theory and Method in Developing Feminist Research on Inference

  • Rachel Joffe Falmagne
Chapter

Summary

Feminist critiques of rationalism as a masculinist cultural construction, and of logic as a component of this regime of truth, extend to the traditional psychological research on inference as well. This discussion explores issues entailed in reconfiguring the theoretical and empirical study of reasoning on new ground informed by critique, a task that I argue is necessary if feminist theories of logic are to avoid producing new canons through rationalist theorizing and if the study of reasoning is to be rescued from its domination by a rationalist tradition. An illustrative qualitative study of reasoning processes with a design and interpretive framework informed by the above critiques and by feminist perspective on epistemology, is used as a vehicle for exposing the meta-theoretical, theoretical and methodological tensions entailed by this transdisciplinary reconstructive project, the ramifications of critique for method and the theory-data problematic.

Keywords

Feminist Theory Feminist Perspective Social Location Reconstructive Project Dialectical Tension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel Joffe Falmagne
    • 1
  1. 1.Clark UniversityUSA

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