Other cereals in breadmaking

  • Stanley P. Cauvain

Abstract

The main thrust of the previous chapters has been accented towards the production of bread from 100% wheat flours but, although such products are universal, there are some bread products around the world which are based on or include a high proportion of non-wheat cereals. In breadmaking terms, rye is the closest of the cereals to wheat with similar protein contents but a distinctly limited ability to form gluten. The closeness of wheat and rye has led to their crossing and the first ‘artificial’ cereal — triticale — which may also be used for breadmaking (Gustafson et al., 1991).

Keywords

Wheat Flour Bread Product Steam Chamber Pregelatinized Starch Cake Batter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley P. Cauvain

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