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Sex Steroid Binding Proteins in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

  • Adele R. Salhanick
  • Ian P. Callard
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 117)

Summary

High affinity cytosolic and nuclear steroid binding macromolecules have been identified in steroid target tissues of representative amphibians, reptiles and birds. In addition to these traditional “receptors” evidence exists which indicates the presence of other steroid binding proteins, varying in affinity and specificity, in the cytosol of steroid targets (liver, oviduct) of these same species. The possible relationships between cytosolic binding proteins of differing affinity and specificity and their relevance to hormone action in non-mammalian species is discussed.

Keywords

Sedimentation Coefficient Sucrose Density Gradient Centrifugation Relative Binding Affinity Cytosol Receptor Free Steroid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adele R. Salhanick
    • 1
  • Ian P. Callard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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