Faith as social capital: Religion and community development in Southern Asia

  • Christopher Candland
Chapter

Abstract

A.T. Ariyaratne’s contention that a preoccupation with the material and financial dimensions of development can undermine its spiritual and cultural dimensions may sound somewhat romantic and impractical. His Sarvodaya Movement, however, based on the philosophy that the material improvement of communities is merely a means to their spiritual awakening, is one of the world¡¯s largest and most effective community development organizations. Most villages in Sri Lanka have had some contact with and been benefited by Sarvodaya community development work. The Sarvodaya Movement is tremendously popular in Sri Lanka, largely because it seeks to facilitate spiritual awakening through community and economic empowerment (Bond, 1996).

Keywords

Social Capital Community Development Religious Association Religious Organization Formal Politics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Candland
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceWellesley CollegeWellesleyUSA

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