Abstract

Compared with several other inorganic components of food, selenium has received relatively little attention in the technical literature until recently. While there is an extensive literature on metals, such as iron, zinc and mercury, whose significance for food quality and legislation has been recognised for many years, selenium is a newcomer in the field and, as such, is still neglected in the non-medical journals. In contrast to the enormous volume of writing on its biomedical aspects, there is a dearth of published information on selenium as a food component and on its significance to the food technologist and the practical nutritionist. Because of this absence of directly pertinent material, it is appropriate here to provide an introduction to this section, which relies heavily on data derived from investigations of better known elements, but which can often, pari passu, be applied to selenium.

Keywords

Human Milk Selenium Concentration GSHPx Activity Selenium Level Selenium Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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