Animal and Vegetable Fats, Oils and Waxes

  • Edmund W. Lusas
  • Khee Choon Rhee

Abstract

Fats and oils predominantly are triesters (triacyiglycerols, triglycerides) of glycerol and aliphatic fatty acids generally containing up to 24 carbon atoms. Waxes are esters of long-chain fatty acids, usually containing 24 to 28 carbon atoms, with long-chain primary alcohols (16 to 36 carbon atoms), or with alcohols of the steroid group.1

Keywords

Cocoa Butter Erucic Acid Sunflower Seed Palm Kernel Propyl Gallate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edmund W. Lusas
  • Khee Choon Rhee
    • 1
  1. 1.Food Protein Research and Development CenterTexas A&M University SystemCollege StationUSA

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