Managing an Emergency Preparedness Program

  • Thaddeus H. Spencer

Abstract

The preceding chapter explored many technical aspects of chemical process safety and some safety management systems that form the foundation of a comprehensive emergency preparedness program. Clearly, the first step in preparing for emergencies is to identify and mitigate the conditions that might cause them. This process starts early in the design phase of a chemical facility, and continues throughout its life. The objective is to prevent emergencies by eliminating hazards wherever possible.

Keywords

Emergency Response Emergency Planning Federal Emergency Management Agency Emergency Preparedness Material Safety Data Sheet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Select Bibliography

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Transportation

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thaddeus H. Spencer
    • 1
  1. 1.Safety and Environmental Management ServicesE. I. du Pont de Nemours and CompanyUSA

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