Coal Technology

  • M. Rashid Khan
  • B. K. Parekh
  • Michael A. Serio
  • G. Todd Hager
  • Frank J. Derbyshire
  • Victor H. Agreda

Abstract

Coal represents over 90 percent of the U.S proven reserves of fossil fuels, and can serve as a source of synthetic fuel for the petro-chemical industry as well as a source of electric power production and process heat generation. About one-third of the world’s coal reserves are present in the United States. The recoverable reserves of U.S. coal have been estimated to be 250 billion tons. Eastern U.S. coals are generally bituminous with a heating value of 10,000 to 15,000 Btu/lb. Bituminous coals comprise nearly one-half of the total U.S. coal reserves. The western as well as southwestern U.S. coals are mainly subbituminous (with a heating value of 9000–12,000 Btu/lb) and lignite (with a heating value of 8000–10,000 Btu/lb).

Keywords

Acetic Anhydride Coal Gasification Bituminous Coal Methyl Acetate Fine Coal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rashid Khan
    • 1
  • B. K. Parekh
    • 2
  • Michael A. Serio
    • 3
  • G. Todd Hager
    • 4
  • Frank J. Derbyshire
    • 4
  • Victor H. Agreda
    • 5
  1. 1.Origin and Classification, Coal Composition and Structure, Pyrolysis, and GasificationTexaco Research and Development: Coordinating author plus Introduction and sections on Coal Production and ConsumptionUSA
  2. 2.Center for Applied Energy ResearchUniversity of Kentucky: Coal Mining and PreparationUSA
  3. 3.Advanced Fuel Research: CombustionUSA
  4. 4.Center for Applied Energy ResearchUniversity of Kentucky: Direct Coal LiquefactionUSA
  5. 5.Eastman Chemical Company: Petrochemical FeedstocksUSA

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