Sulfur and Sulfuric Acid

  • Robin W. Strickland

Abstract

Sulfur is one of the few elements that is found in its elemental form in nature. Typical sulfur deposits occur in sedimentary limestone/ gypsum formations, in limestone/anhydrite formations associated with salt domes, or in volcanic rock.4 A yellow solid at normal temperatures, sulfur becomes progressively lighter in color at lower temperatures and is almost white at the temperature of liquid air. It melts at 114 to 119°C (depending on crystalline form) to a transparent light yellow liquid, becoming deep orange as the temperature is increased. The low viscosity of the liquid begins to rise sharply above 160°C, peaking at 93 Pa • s at 188°C, and then falling as the temperature continues to rise to its boiling point of 445°C. This and other anomalous properties of the liquid state are due to equilibria between the various molecular species of sulfur, which include small rings and chains.

Keywords

Hydrogen Sulfide Contact Process Sulfur Trioxide Waste Heat Boiler Acid Mist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin W. Strickland

There are no affiliations available

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