Juice enhancement by ion exchange and adsorbent technologies

  • S. I. Norman

Abstract

This chapter describes the various processes employed by industry to enhance the quality of a juice or juice by-product. These enhancement processes can be broadly described as being either ion exchange and/or adsorption technologies. The various juices include, but are not limited to, apple, pear, white grape, orange juice and pineapple mill juice, a juice by-product. Juice enhancement refers to the improvement in a juice’s characteristics as dictated by consumer demand for a particular juice or juice related drink. An enhancement typically refers to reduction of a juice’s acidity, color, odor, flavor, improvement in shelf stability or a combination of these characteristics. In order for the reader to better understand the various enhancement processes, a brief historical summary of the technology along with a description of the various media is offered.

Keywords

Fruit Juice Orange Juice Color Body Anion Resin Pear Juice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, B. A. and Holmes, E. L. (1935) J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 54, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Applebaum, S. B. (1968) Demineralization by Ion Exchange, Academic Press, New York, Chap. 1.Google Scholar
  3. Assar, K. (1979) Proceedings of the 19th Annual Short Course for the Food Industry 13, 114.Google Scholar
  4. Austerweil, G. V. (1957) In: Ion Exchangers in Organic and Biochemistry, Wiley Interscience, New York, Chap. 33.Google Scholar
  5. Belter, P. A., Cussler, E. L. and Hu, W. S. (1988) Bioseparations, Downstream Processing for Biotechnology, Wiley Interscience, New York, Chap. 6.Google Scholar
  6. Cantor, S. M. and Spitz, A. W. (1956) In: Ion Exchange Technology, Academic Press, New York, Chap. 18.Google Scholar
  7. Chandler, B. V. and Johnson, R. L. (1977) J. Sci. Food Agric. 28, 875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Chandler, B. V. and Johnson, R. L. (1979) J. Sci. Food Agric. 30, 825.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Chandler, B. V., Kefford, J. F. and Ziemelis, G. (1968) J. Sci. Food Agric. 19, 83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Diamond Shamrock Chemical Company (1972) Duolite Ion Exchange Resins in the Treatment of Sugar Solutions, Functional Polymers Division, Cleveland, OH, p. 34.Google Scholar
  11. The Dow Chemical Company (1985) Dowex Ion Exchange Resins for Processing Foods, Separation and Process Systems Department, Midland, MI.Google Scholar
  12. Doying, E. G. (1965) In: Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, Vol. 4, 2nd edn., John Wiley, New York, p. 149.Google Scholar
  13. Harm, F. (1896) German Patent 95, 447.Google Scholar
  14. Helfferich, F. (1962) Ion Exchange, McGraw-Hill, New York, Chap. 1–6, 9.Google Scholar
  15. Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (1987) Newsletter, Vol. 5(2), Cicero, IL, p. 4.Google Scholar
  16. Johnson, R. L. and Chandler, B. V. (1988) Food Technol. 42 (5), 130.Google Scholar
  17. Kawamura, S. (1983) Seventy Years of Maillard Reaction, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, Chapter 1.Google Scholar
  18. Keller II, G. E., Anderson, R. A. and Yon, C. M. (1987) In: Handbook of Separation Process Technology, John Wiley, New York, Chap. 12.Google Scholar
  19. Kilburn, R. W. and Drager, H. P. (1965) U.S. Patent 3, 165, 415.Google Scholar
  20. Kressman, T. R. E. (1957) In: Ion Exchangers in Organic and Biochemistry, Wiley Interscience, New York, Chap. 1.Google Scholar
  21. Kunin, R. (1958) Ion Exchange Resins, 2nd edn., John Wiley, New York, Chap. 2–5, 9, 14, 17.Google Scholar
  22. Kunin, R. and Myers, R. J. (1950) Ion Exchange Resins, John Wiley, New York, Chap. 1, 2, 10.Google Scholar
  23. Maier, V. P., Hasegawa, S., Bennett, R. D. and Echols, L. C. (1980) In: Citrus Nutrition and Quality, Vol. 143, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, Chap. 4.Google Scholar
  24. Mindler, A. B. (1957) In: Ion Exchangers in Organic and Biochemistry, Wiley Interscience, New York, Chap. 32.Google Scholar
  25. Mitchell, D. H. and Pearce, R. M. (1985) U.S. Patent 4, 514, 427. Google Scholar
  26. Puri, A. (1984) U.S. Patent 4, 439, 458.Google Scholar
  27. Ribéreau-Gayon, P. (1974) In : Chemistry of Wine Making, Vol. 137, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, Chap. 3.Google Scholar
  28. Schubert, J. and Nachod, F. C. (1956) In: Ion Exchange Technology, Academic Press, New York, Chap. 1.Google Scholar
  29. Shaw, P. E. and Wilson, C. W. (1983) J. Food Sci. 48, 646.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Streat, M. and Cloete, F. L. D. (1987) In: Handbook of Separation Process Technology, John Wiley, New York, Chap. 13.Google Scholar
  31. Thompson, H. S. (1850) J. R. Agric. Soc. Engl. 11, 68.Google Scholar
  32. Varsel, C. (1980) In: Citrus Nutrition and Quality, Vol. 143, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, Chap. 11.Google Scholar
  33. Way, J. T. (1850) J. R. Agric. Soc. Engl. 11, 313.Google Scholar
  34. Way, J. T. (1852) J. R. Agric. Soc. Engl. 13, 123.Google Scholar
  35. Wheaton, R. M. and Seamster, A. H. (1966) In: Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, Vol. 11, 2nd edn., John Wiley, New York, p. 871.Google Scholar
  36. Zemanek, L. A. (1984) In: Proc. 43rd Annual Meeting of Sugar Industry Technologists, Sugar Industry Technologists, Martinez, CA, p. 101.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. I. Norman

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations