Authentication of orange juice

  • J. Fry
  • G. G. Martin
  • M. Lees

Abstract

It may be safely assumed that fruit juice falsification is a permanent hazard of commercial life. In 1936, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) records orange juice being adulterated with sugar, citric acid, peel flavour and colour (Johnston and Kauffman, 1985), a form of dilution that is still found today. In 1981, a pilot survey by the FDA found minor irregularities in nearly half the orange juice firms inspected, and 3 of 13 companies were using illegal colours or pulp wash (Johnston and Kauffman, 1985). In 1982, the Washington Post was claiming that in one major US city ‘fake juice is so common people don’t remember what real juice tastes like’ (Mitchell, 1982). The size of the problem is always unclear, but informed sources in 1983 were suggesting that up to 30% of the juice in the United States was adulterated to some degree, despite official assurances to the contrary. The feeling seems to be that this has since fallen to around 10%. There is some disagreement about the value of the US orange juice market, put at $3800 × 106 in 1983 by Nikdel and Nagy (1985) and, more conservatively, at about $2000 × 106 in 1987 (Doner et al., 1987), but the economic value of juice adulteration is substantial.

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Fruit Juice Orange Juice Apple Juice Grapefruit Juice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Further reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Fry
  • G. G. Martin
  • M. Lees

There are no affiliations available

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