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Animal Models of Diabetes

  • Martin Haluzik
  • Marc L. Reitman

Abstract

Animal models have had a major role in shaping our current understanding of diabetes, and should become even more important in the future. Two major purposes of animal models are to improve understanding the physiology of diabetes and promote development of new therapeutic compounds. Important contributions have come from both classical laboratory animal models and new ones made using advanced methods of genetic manipulation. This chapter reviews the different types of animal models, with emphasis on the more commonly used and informative animals. Models of type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and obesity are considered. For further information, the reader is referred to the more detailed reviews listed at the end of this chapter.1,2

Keywords

Insulin Resistance White Adipose Tissue Clinical Text Early Onset Obesity Agouti Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Haluzik
  • Marc L. Reitman

There are no affiliations available

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