Aggression prevention in cross-cultural perspective

From Finns to Zapotecs
  • Douglas P. Fry
Chapter

Abstract

Anthropologists seldom have paid explicit attention to the ways in which aggression can be prevented. Exceptions include Marshall’s1 classic consideration of how reciprocal sharing, gift exchange, and vociferous talking prevent violence among the !Kung of the Kalahari, Gardner’s2 discussion of conflict resolution mechanisms among the Paliyan of India, Hollan’s3 treatment of conflict avoidance among the Toraja of Indonesia, and Fry’s4 consideration of internal and external mechanisms of aggression control in two Zapotec communities in Mexico. Although, prevention has received relatively little explicit attention by anthropologists, nonetheless, examples of aggression prevention measures can be culled from ethnographic sources. In this chapter, I will draw on diverse ethnographic accounts in order to propose a preliminary typology of aggression prevention measures.

Keywords

Explicit Attention Gift Exchange Conflict Avoidance Aggression Control Rienner Publisher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas P. Fry
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Developmental PsychologyÅbo Akademi UniversityVasaFinland
  2. 2.Bureau of Applied Research in AnthropologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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