Trade and Exchange in the Midwestern United States

  • David S. Brose
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The Midwest is an amorphous region whose boundaries have been better defined by neighbors objecting to membership than by occupants. So defined, the prehistoric Midwest in this volume is bounded by the Plains, the Lower Mississippi Valley, the Southeast, the Atlantic seaboard, and the St. Lawrence Valley. This area, which at times displays some coherence in economic and social behavior, includes the drainage basin of the Great Lakes, the eastern tributaries of the upper Mississippi, and the Ohio drainage from Pittsburgh to the junction of the Tennessee. In the Archaic and Woodland periods most of the prairie region drained by the lower western Mississippi tributaries and the northern tributaries to the lower Missouri River, as well as the entire Ohio River basin, could be considered a greater Midwest. During the Mississippian period the central Mississippi and Ohio valleys below the Wabash were extensions of the Southeast.

Keywords

Great Lake Grave Good Late Archaic Marine Shell Lower Great Lake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • David S. Brose
    • 1
  1. 1.The Royal Ontario MuseumTorontoCanada

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