Abstract

The diode is a switch, but it is an uncontrolled switch. No signals can turn the diode on or off. Its action depends entirely on the voltages and currents of the circuit to which the diode is connected. It is described here in some detail because its structure is the foundation of all the devices that follow in this text, and it has important applications.

Keywords

Voltage Drop Power Dissipation Reverse Bias Minority Carrier Junction Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© R.S. Ramshaw 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Ramshaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of WaterlooOntarioCanada

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