Amniotic Fluid: Biochemical Assays Relating to Fetal Viability

  • Laszlo Sarkozi

Abstract

The selection of this body fluid for inclusion in this book is self-explanatory. This chapter attempts to describe reasons for obtaining the amniotic fluid; its composition, which depends on its origin; and the great wealth of information on the well-being of the fetus obtained by performing biochemical assays of amniotic fluid. References on cytologic, histochemical, and biochemical studies of suspended cells obtained from amniotic fluid are listed and intended as background information in the pursuit of further studies. Most of these studies today are performed only by investigators and some research-oriented laboratories. However, they conduct successful screening programs for the most frequent fetal biochemical disorders and the research tools of yesterday are the routine tests of today. Only 10 years ago, about 20 papers were published annually on amniotic fluid; presently, over 500 publications a year deal with this subject, also several chapters and entire books39, 47, 50, 88, 92, 94,186–188, 210, 213, 238, 259, 282 have been published on amniotic fluid. It was unavoidable that numerous valuable reports concerned with so many separate fields were omitted from this chapter. Detailed discussion of amniotic fluid biochemical assays is restricted to those procedures that are routinely performed by a large number of clinical laboratories, as of 1975.

Keywords

Amniotic Fluid Antenatal Diagnosis Maple Syrup Urine Disease Metachromatic Leukodystrophy Amniotic Fluid Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laszlo Sarkozi

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