Modeling of Oxygen Diffusion and Metabolism from Capillary to Muscle

  • Ping Huang
  • Britton Chance
  • Xin Wang
  • Ryotaro Kime
  • Shoko Nioka
  • Edwin M. Chance
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 540)

Abstract

In the bioengineering and sports training field, there are interests in obtaining information on oxygen transport and metabolism during muscle exercise. The goal of our study was to develop a time-dependent model which can simulate the changes in oxygen diffusion and metabolism in muscle tissue, especially from capillary to mitochondria. We postulate that oxygen diffuses into the tissue at a rate proportional to the oxygen concentration in plasma when applied to a steady state condition. As we know, any build up of oxygen in the tissue is directly related to oxygen leaving the capillary into the tissue and the consumption of oxygen by the mitochondria, or the metabolic demand. We designed a model which consisted of four compartments: (1) capillary; (2) interstitial space between capillary and myofibril tissue cell; (3) parenchymal cell through myofibril to mitochondria in muscle tissue; (4) at mitochondria. Oxygen comes from arteriole to capillary, then diffuses to mitochondria through interstitial space and myofibril. Oxygen is reduced to water in mitochondria, and ATP is generated through proton transport. Our model simulates the measured oxygen uptake during rest and muscle exercise as the input oxygen uptake represented as H2O formation.

Keywords

Oxygen Concentration Oxygen Diffusion Interstitial Space Oxygen Transport Differential Equation Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ping Huang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Britton Chance
    • 1
  • Xin Wang
    • 1
  • Ryotaro Kime
    • 1
  • Shoko Nioka
    • 1
  • Edwin M. Chance
    • 2
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.University CollegeLondonEngland
  3. 3.Northern Jiaotong UniversityBeijingChina

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