EPR Spectroscopic Evidence of Free Radical Outflow from an Isolated Muscle Bed in Exercising Humans

Functional Significance of ↓Intracellular PO2vs. ↑O2 Flux
  • Damian M. Bailey
  • Bruce Davies
  • Ian S. Young
  • Malcolm J. Jackson
  • Gareth W. Davison
  • Roger Isaacson
  • Russell S. Richardson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 540)

Abstract

Animal research has established much about the species and mechanisms associated with free radical generation in exercising muscle tissue (Davies et al., 1982; Jackson et al., 1985; Reid, 2001). However, the direct molecular detection of free radical species in exercising humans remains a formidable analytical challenge due primarily to their high reactivity and low steady-state concentration. Consequently, investigators have typically relied on exercise-induced changes in biological footprints formed as a consequence of the molecular interaction of free radicals with cellular components containing lipids and proteins. However, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a technique capable of detecting free radicals directly, yet its application to the physiological environment has to date been limited due to the intricate nature of biological materials.

Keywords

Spin Trap Spin Adduct Knee Extensor Exercise Intermittent Hypoxic Training Typical Electron Paramagnetic Resonance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Damian M. Bailey
    • 1
    • 5
  • Bruce Davies
    • 1
  • Ian S. Young
    • 2
  • Malcolm J. Jackson
    • 3
  • Gareth W. Davison
    • 1
  • Roger Isaacson
    • 4
  • Russell S. Richardson
  1. 1.School of Applied SciencesUniversity of GlamorganPontypridd, South WalesUK
  2. 2.Department of MedicineQueen’s UniversityBelfastUK
  3. 3.Department of MedicineUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  4. 4.Divison of PhysicsUniversity of California San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineUniversity of California San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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