The Effects of Food Intake on Muscle Oxygen Consumption

Noninvasive Measurement Using NIRS
  • Chihoko Ueda
  • Takafumi Hamaoka
  • Norio Murase
  • Takuya Osada
  • Takayuki Sako
  • Motohide Murakami
  • Ryotaro Kime
  • Toshiyuki Homma
  • Takeshi Nagasawa
  • Aya Kitahara
  • Shiro Ichimura
  • Tetsushi Moriguchi
  • Naoki Nakagawa
  • Toshihito Katsumura
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 540)

Abstract

Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is the energy expended in excess of resting metabolic rate for digestion, absorption, transport, metabolism, and storage of foods. Despite a large number of studies on human DIT (Bahr et al., 1991; Burkhard-Jagodzinska et al., 1999; Pittet et al., 1974; Segal et al., 1990; Sekhar et al., 1998; Van Zant et al., 1992; Westerterp et al., 1999), it is not clear in which tissues DIT mainly takes place. Although Astrup et al. (1985, 1986) have shown the possible involvement of skeletal muscle with DIT in humans, rather than brown adipose tissue, there have been few studies examining DIT in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the effects of various kinds of food, especially sympathetic nervous system (SNS) stimulating agents such as cayenne pepper, on human skeletal muscle metabolism are not fully understood.

Keywords

Sympathetic Nervous System Brown Adipose Tissue Arterial Occlusion Sympathetic Nervous System Activity Pulmonary Oxygen Uptake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Acheson K. J., Ravussin E., Wahren J., and Jequier E., 1984, Thermic effect of glucose in man. Obligatory and facultative thermogenesis, J Clin Invest. 74: 1572–80.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Astrup, A., Bulow, J., Madsen. J., and Christensen, N. J., 1985, Contribution of BAT and skeletal muscle to thermogenesis induced by ephedrine in man, Am J Physiol 248: E507–515.Google Scholar
  3. Astrup, A., Bulow, J., Christensen, N. J., Madsen, J., and Quaade, F., 1986, Facultative thermogenesis induced by carbohydrate: a skeletal muscle component mediated by epinephrine, Am.1 Physiol 250: E226–229.Google Scholar
  4. Bahr, R., and Sejersted, O. M., 1991, Effect of feeding and fasting on excess postexercise oxygen consumption, J App/ Physiol 71: 2088–2093.Google Scholar
  5. Beaver W. L., Wasserman K., and Whipp B. J., 1973, On-line computer analysis and breath-by-breath graphical display of exercise function tests, JAppl Physiol, 34: 128–132.Google Scholar
  6. Blei, M. L., Conley, K. E., and Kushmerick, M. J., 1993, Separate measures of ATP utilization and recovery in human skeletal muscle, J Physiol 465: 203–222.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Burkhard-Jagodzinska, K., Nazar, K., Ladyga, M., Starczewska-Czapowska, J., and Borkowski, L., 1999, Resting metabolic rate and thermogenic effect of glucose in trained and untrained girls age 11–15 years, Int JSport Nutr 9: 378–390.Google Scholar
  8. Chance, B., Dait, M. T., Zhang, C., Hamaoka, T., and Hagerman, F., 1992, Recovery from exercise-induced desaturation in the quadriceps muscles of elite competitive rowers, Am JPhysiol 262: C766–775.Google Scholar
  9. Hamaoka, T., Iwane, H., Shimomitsu, T., Katsumura, T., Murase, N., Nishio, S., Osada, T., Kurosawa, Y., and Chance, B., 1996, Noninvasive measures of oxidative metabolism on working human muscles by near-infrared spectroscopy, JAppl Physiol 81: 1410–1417.Google Scholar
  10. Harris, R. C., Hultman, E., and Nordesjo, L. 0., 1974, Glycogen, glycolytic intermediates and high-energy phosphates determined in biopsy samples of musculus quadriceps femoris of man at rest. Methods and variance of values, ScandJClin Lab Invest 33: 109–120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Lim, K., Yoshioka, M., Kikuzato, S., Kiyonaga, A., Tanaka, H., Shindo, M., Suzuki, M., 1997, Dietary red pepper ingestion increases carbohydrate oxidation at rest and during exercise in runners, Med Sci Sports Exerc. 29: 355–61.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Murakami, M., Katsumura, T., Hamaoka, T., Osada, T., Sako, T., Higuchi, H., Esaki, K., Kime, R., and Shimomitsu, T., 2000, Effects of epinephrine and lactate on the increase in oxygen consumption of nonexercising skeletal muscle after aerobic exercise, J Biomed Opt 5: 406–410.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Yamamoto, Y., Hughson, R. L., and Peterson J. C., 1991, Autonomic control of heart rate during exercise studied by heart rate variability spectral analysis, JAppl Physiol. 71: 1136–42.Google Scholar
  14. Pittet, P., Gygax, P. H., and Jequier, E., 1974, Thermic effect of glucose and amino acids in man studied by direct and indirect calorimetry, BrJ Nutr 31: 343–349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Sako, T., Hamaoka, T., Higuchi, H., Kurosawa, Y., and Katsumura, T., 2001, Validity of NIR spectroscopy for quantitatively measuring muscle oxidative metabolic rate in exercise, JAppl Physiol 90: 338–344.Google Scholar
  16. Segal, K. R., Edano, A., Blando, L., and Pi-Sunyer, F. X., 1990, Comparison of thermic effects of constant and relative caloric loads in lean and obese men, Am J Clin Nutr 51: 14–21.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Sekhar, R. V., Shetty, P. S., and Kurpad, A. V., 1998, Diet induced thermogenesis with oral intravenous feeding in chronically undernourished human subjects, Indian JMed Res 108: 265–271.Google Scholar
  18. Van Zant, R. S., 1992, Influence of diet and exercise on energy expenditure-a review. Int.1 Sport Nutr 2: 1–19.Google Scholar
  19. Westerterp, K. R., Wilson, S. A., Rolland, V., 1999, Diet induced thermogenesis measured over 24h in a respiration chamber: effect of diet composition, Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 23: 287–292.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chihoko Ueda
    • 1
  • Takafumi Hamaoka
    • 1
    • 2
  • Norio Murase
    • 1
  • Takuya Osada
    • 1
  • Takayuki Sako
    • 3
  • Motohide Murakami
    • 1
  • Ryotaro Kime
    • 1
  • Toshiyuki Homma
    • 1
  • Takeshi Nagasawa
    • 1
  • Aya Kitahara
    • 1
  • Shiro Ichimura
    • 1
  • Tetsushi Moriguchi
    • 1
  • Naoki Nakagawa
    • 4
  • Toshihito Katsumura
    • 1
  1. 1.Tokyo Medical UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.National Institute of Fitness and Sports in KanoyaKagoshimaJapan
  3. 3.Japan Women’s UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.St.Cecilia Women’s Jr. CollegeTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations