Estimation of Cerebral Blood Flow in a Newborn Piglet Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

  • Kensuke Okubo
  • Tadashi Imai
  • Masanori Namba
  • Takashi Kusaka
  • Saneyuki Yasuda
  • Kou Kawada
  • Kenichi Isobe
  • Susumu Itoh
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 540)

Abstract

Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborn infants is one of the causes of later serious brain damage. In recent years, hypothermia therapy has attracted attention as an effective means of for preventing HIE-induced brain damage and has been used clinically 1, 2,3. However, the problem of which newborn infants should be selected for hypothermia therapy remains unsolved. Currently, selection is based on results of various tests such as neurological tests, blood biochemical tests and electroencephalography (EEG) 4. However, there is no definitive evaluation method.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Newborn Infant Indocyanine Green Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Newborn Piglet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kensuke Okubo
  • Tadashi Imai
  • Masanori Namba
  • Takashi Kusaka
    • 1
  • Saneyuki Yasuda
  • Kou Kawada
    • 1
  • Kenichi Isobe
  • Susumu Itoh
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics and Maternal Perinatal CenterKagawa Medical UniversityKitagun, KagawaJapan

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