Oscillator tuning

  • Jan R. Westra
  • Chris J. M. Verhoeven
  • Arthur H. M. van Roermund
Chapter

Abstract

In many applications there is a need for low-phase-noise oscillators that can be tuned continuously as well as in discrete steps. This tuning is required either for modulation purposes or to correct production spread, aging, temperature effects, etc. However, low phase noise and good tenability have always been conflicting requirements in oscillators. A good tunability implies that the oscillator has no particular frequency of preference, while low phase-noise can only be accomplished in oscillators having a profound preference for a certain frequency [1, 6, 13, 14, 16, 17]. In Section 3.2 and chapters 5 and 6, we have seen that for example second-order complex-pole timing references are better able to suppress the noise originating from the active circuitry than a first-order timing reference. This is entirely due to the inherent frequency of preference of the second-order complex-pole timing-references. In this chapter it is shown that due to this inherent frequency of preference, these oscillators require different tuning strategies to oscillators that do not have this frequency of preference.

Keywords

Tuning Range Timing Reference Tuning Method Crystal Oscillator Negative Capacitance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan R. Westra
    • 1
  • Chris J. M. Verhoeven
    • 2
  • Arthur H. M. van Roermund
    • 2
  1. 1.Philips Research LaboratoriesThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Delft University of TechnologyThe Netherlands

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