Temperature Measurements

  • Jonathan W. Valvano
  • John Pearce
Part of the Lasers, Photonics, and Electro-Optics book series (LPEO)

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to present the fundamental mechanisms, instrumentation techniques, and error analyses for temperature measurements in laser-irradiated biologic media. Because temperature is a significant biological parameter, it is important to understand and minimize potential measurement errors.1–8 Temperature measurements in a radiative field are particularly difficult because:
  • there is direct optical absorption of laser energy into a temperature sensor;

  • the temperature can exceed 300 °C;

  • the spatial temperature gradients can be up to 50 °C/mm;

  • the laser pulse durations can be as short as 10 ns.

Keywords

Tissue Temperature Emissive Power Thermal Camera Probe Radius Finite Difference Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan W. Valvano
    • 1
  • John Pearce
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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