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Cognitive Processing and Models of Reading

  • Erik D. Reichle
  • Keith Rayner
Part of the Topics in Biomedical Engineering International Book Series book series (TOBE)

Abstract

Reading involves the orchestration of many information-processing stages; as the eyes move across the printed page, the visual features of the text are converted into orthographic and phonological patterns, which are then used to guide further language processing so that the content of the text can be understood. One can gain an appreciation of the complexity of these processes by examining the table of contents in a psychology of reading textbook; minimally, one finds chapters devoted to the topics of eye movement control, word recognition, semantic and syntactic analyses, and discourse processing (Just and Carpenter, 1987; Perfetti, 1985; Rayner and Pollatsek, 1989; Taylor and Taylor, 1983).

Keywords

Word Recognition Fixation Duration Lexical Access Oculomotor System Character Space 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erik D. Reichle
    • 1
  • Keith Rayner
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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