Longitudinal Studies of Personality and Intelligence

A Behavior Genetic and Evolutionary Psychology Perspective
  • Thomas J. BouchardJr.
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

In 1882 Sir Francis Galton called for the creation of “anthropometric laboratories”:

The leading ideas of such a laboratory is I have in view, were that its measurement should effectually “sample” a man with reasonable completeness. It should measure absolutely where it was possible, otherwise relatively among his close fellows, the quality of each selected faculty. The next step would be to estimate the combined effect of these separately measured faculties in any given proportion and ultimately to ascertain the degree with which the measurement of sample faculties in youth justifies a prophecy of further success in life, using the word “success” in its most literal meaning. (Galton, 1885, p. 206)

Keywords

Twin Study Intellectual Skill Longitudinal Twin Study Specific Cognitive Ability Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. BouchardJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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