Intelligence and Personality in School and Educational Psychology

  • Jeffery P. Braden
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Intelligence and personality are fundamental to understanding children’s performance in schools. The first practical intelligence test was developed by Binet and Simon for use in Parisian public schools, and schools have remained the primary source for research and application regarding theories of intelligence. Although research regarding personality has generally evolved in clinical settings and then been transferred to schools, educators continue to develop and apply theories and techniques drawn from personality research.

Keywords

Mental Retardation Educational Psychology Disable Child Emotional Disturbance Attributional Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffery P. Braden
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

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