Test Bias and the Assessment of Intelligence and Personality

  • Cecil R. Reynolds
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The issues of bias in psychological testing have been a source of intense and recurring social controversy throughout the history of mental measurement. In the United States, discussions pertaining to test bias are frequently accompanied by emotionally laden polemics decrying the use of mental tests with any minority group member, because ethnic minorities have not been exposed to the cultural and environmental circumstances and values of the white middle class. Intertwined within the general issue of bias in tests has been the more specific question of whether intelligence tests should be used for educational purposes.

Keywords

White Child Black Child Cultural Bias Test Bias Item Bias 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cecil R. Reynolds
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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