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Abstract

This is the first book on traumatic stress that examines multigenerational effects of trauma across various victim/survivor populations around the world from multidimensional, multidisciplinary perspectives. It seeks to provide a comprehensive picture of the knowledge accumulated worldwide to date, including clinical, theoretical, research, and policy perspectives.

Keywords

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Stress International Criminal Court Intergenerational Transmission Jewish Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yael Danieli
    • 1
  1. 1.Private PracticeGroup Project for Holocaust Survivors and Their ChildrenNew YorkUSA

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