An Update of Childhood Meningococcal Sepsis

  • J. Ramet
  • N. Najafi
  • A. Benatar
Conference paper

Abstract

In 1805, Vieusseux reported the first identification of meningococcal disease [1] while the causative organism, Neisseria meningitidis, was first isolated in 1887 [2]. In 1919 Herrick stated with respect to meningococcal infections “no other infection so quickly slays” [3], a statement that still holds true 80 years later.

Keywords

Meningococcal Disease Neisseria Meningitidis Adrenal Hemorrhage Invasive Meningococcal Disease Hemodynamic Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Ramet
  • N. Najafi
  • A. Benatar

There are no affiliations available

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