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Intense sweeteners

  • L. O’Brien Nabors
  • R. C. Gelardi

Abstract

Intense sweeteners represent one of the most fascinating areas of food science. Chemically these products are extremely diverse, from amino acids (e.g. aspartame) to halogenated sugars (e.g. sucralose). Several of these products were discovered accidentally (e.g. saccharin), while others are the result of concerted efforts to develop a commercially viable high intensity sweetener (e.g. alitame).

Keywords

Bake Good Intense Sweetener Sodium Saccharin Alternative Sweetener Joint Expert Committee 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. O’Brien Nabors
  • R. C. Gelardi

There are no affiliations available

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