Sweeteners: statutory aspects

  • D. J. Snodin

Abstract

For any urbanised society to be adequately nourished there must be a way of ensuring a good standard of food supply. In recognition of this, dating back at least 2000 years, codes of practice were established to control commercial malpractice such as giving short weights and adulteration of staple foodstuffs. The Romans used food inspectors to take samples of imported grain which were kept in sealed bags as a check against later adulteration. In the Netherlands, as early as 1196, inspectors supervised the Utrecht fish markets. Today, when we have adequate food to meet our basic requirements, the emphasis of regulatory activity has switched to the control of health risks. In respect of additives this trend has led to the development of an increasingly complex web of legislation controlling the introduction of new ingredients and the surveillance and periodic reevaluation of substances already present in the food supply.

Keywords

Food Additive Safety Factor Soft Drink European Economic Community Acceptable Daily Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

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  • D. J. Snodin

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