Abstract

The deaf are a unique group in hearing society with their own languages and culture. Deaf children, however, have hearing parents in 90 to 95% of cases and are, so to speak, born into two worlds: The deaf world potentially provides social and emotional support and feelings of affiliation and identity, whereas the larger hearing society promises employment and is responsible for education. The pressures and problems of deafness have long been suspected of contributing to emotional disorder, but the diagnosis is not straightforward. It is not simply a matter of administering a test, which has usually been developed for hearing children. The tension between the “medical/pathological” view of deafness and the “cultural” view must be understood to establish the real incidence and severity of emotional disorders in deaf children.

Keywords

Sign Language Emotional Disorder Impaired Child Deaf People Hearing Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Arnold
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ManchesterManchesterEngland

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