Theory and Research in the Study of Childhood Exceptionalities

  • Eric J. Mash
  • David J. A. Dozois
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Theory and research in the study of childhood exceptionalities are currently in a state of rapid change (Adelman, 1995; Kazdin & Kagan, 1994; Mash & Krahn, 1995). This change has been fueled by converging sources of evidence in support of a multidimensional view of childhood exceptionalities and a growing recognition that many of our previous models of exceptionality have failed to capture the complexities associated with such a view (Cicchetti & Cohen, 1995; Hersen & Ammerman, 1995; Mash & Barkley, 1996). Current approaches to exceptionality recognize (1) the multiple and interacting ways in which exceptionalities in children are expressed; (2) the importance of contextual influences and multiple perspectives in describing and understanding exceptionality; (3) the dynamic and changing nature of childhood exceptionalities; (4) the multiple determinants that contribute to most forms of exceptionality; and (5) the need to consider multiple pathways and outcomes in studying childhood exceptionalities (Mash & Dozois, 1996; Mash & Wolfe, 1999).

Keywords

Adolescent Psychiatry Behavioral Inhibition Developmental Pathway Social Withdrawal Autistic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric J. Mash
    • 1
  • David J. A. Dozois
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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