Gas and Liquid Chromatography: Methodology Applied to Olive Oil

  • Maria Teresa Morales
  • Manuel León-Camacho

Abstract

Olive oil, like other oils and fats (Karleskind & Wolff 1996), consists of a large number of compounds, which results in a highly complex matrix. When studying its composition in order to typify it or to verify its quality, the analytical chemist finds a powerful tool in chromatographic methods, which are mainly separative techniques that also can be used for quantification. In current regulations (EC 1991; Codex Alimentarius 1993; IOOC 1997), most of the techniques applied to the analysis of fats and oils, with the aim of defining and characterizing them, are liquid or gas chromatographic techniques.

Keywords

Aliphatic Alcohol Unsaponifiable Matter High Performance Liquid Chro Sterol Fraction Triterpenic Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Teresa Morales
  • Manuel León-Camacho

There are no affiliations available

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