Classical Social Theory and Family Studies

The Triumph of Reactionary Thought in Contemporary Family Studies
  • Brian S. Vargus

Abstract

The world of social theory, particularly as it is applied to family and gender issues, has become a tangle of claims and counterclaims regarding ideological predisposition and the sheer impossibility of understanding the world without the appropriate perspective. Therefore, it seems important to review the myriad threads of classical social theory that have the origins and impact of familial, blood, and marital ties as part of their concern.

Keywords

Human Nature Social Theory Family Study Practical Wisdom French Revolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian S. Vargus
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political Science and Indiana University Public Opinion LaboratoryIndiana University-Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA

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