Demography and Families

  • Jay D. Teachman
  • Karen A. Polonko
  • John Scanzoni

Abstract

In recent years, the demography of families has drawn increasing attention from a number of disciplines, including sociology, history, anthropology, economics, psychology, and family studies. This chapter aims, first, to summarize the major empirical themes of family demography. Second, it aims to place these themes within a conceptual and explanatory framework..

Keywords

Labor Force Participation American Sociological Review Divorce Rate Marital Dissolution Marital Disruption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay D. Teachman
    • 1
  • Karen A. Polonko
    • 2
  • John Scanzoni
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of SociologyWestern Washington UniversityBellinghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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