Abstract

For most adults, family and work roles are the most significant sources of identity. Historically, social scientists investigated work and family roles as if they were separate from one another; the family and the economy were studied as distinct social institutions. As more women have entered the paid labor force, researchers have paid increasing attention to linkages between family and work (Bielby and Bielby, 1988b). We can no longer ignore that most individuals are trying to balance work and family roles—87% of American adults live with other family members and 47% are responsible for the care of a dependent family member (children, ill partner, or ill parent) (Galinsky, Bond, & Friedman, 1993).

Keywords

Domestic Work Marital Quality Family Role Maternal Employment Household Labor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Haas
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyIndiana University-Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA

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