Contemporary Family Patterns and Relationships

  • John DeFrain
  • David H. Olson

Abstract

When Americans refer to traditional family values and dynamics, they commonly extol the virtues of lifelong marriage with children. Tradition in our culture holds that (1) being married is better than being single; (2) being married is better than living together; (3) having children is better than not having children; (4) two parents are better than one; (5) blood is thicker than water (i.e., especially when applied to distinctions between biological parents and stepparents); and (6) a mother at home is better than a mother at work, which is father’s domain.

Keywords

Single Mother Child Support Marital Stability Family Pattern Single Father 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John DeFrain
    • 1
  • David H. Olson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Consumer SciencesUniversity of NebraskaLincolnUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family Social SciencesUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA

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