Child Victims of Sexual Abuse

  • David A. Wolfe
  • Vicky V. Wolfe
  • Connie L. Best

Abstract

Attitudes about the occurrence of sexual behavior between adults and children have shown considerable changes throughout history. Whether such behavior was considered abuse has been dependent on societal values of the particular period, with different cultures considering adult—child sexual relations to be normal, immoral, criminal, or psychopathological (P. B. Mrazek, 1981a). Over the last several generations, North American culture has viewed adult—child sexual relations primarily from the perspective of the adult’s social deviance, which has prompted legal and psychiatric definitions and interventions for such behavior. However, only within the past 25 years has the concern about sexual child abuse focused on the needs of the child victims, leading to a significant shift from adult psychopathology to more of a child protection orientation.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Abuse Child Child Sexual Abuse Attributional Style Child Protective Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Wolfe
    • 1
  • Vicky V. Wolfe
    • 1
  • Connie L. Best
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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