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Physical Abuse of Children

  • Raymond H. StarrJr.
Chapter

Abstract

Cruelty toward and maltreatment of children has become a topic of much social concern during the past 20 years. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the roots of this concern, analyze the magnitude of the problem, review current knowledge and, lastly, provide a framework for considering treatment, prediction, and prevention. Only physical abuse will be discussed; other forms of maltreatment such as sexual abuse, neglect, and institutional abuse are beyond the scope of this review. The terms abuse and maltreatment will be used synonymously and refer to inflicted trauma or injury by parents or other caregivers.

Keywords

Child Welfare Physical Abuse Corporal Punishment Child Psychiatry Child Protection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond H. StarrJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyCatonsvilleUSA

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