Sociological Perspectives in Family Violence

  • Carl A. Bersani
  • Huey-Tsyh Chen

Abstract

It is common knowledge that not many years ago the problem of family violence was virtually ignored. It has not been that many years since a diversity of disciplines began to offer explanations for our “newly discovered” phenomena. Our popular literature now calls what was previously ignored “private” violence, as contrasted to the more visible public violence to which our theorists and researchers in sociology have always directed their efforts. Although sociologists are late arrivals in the study of family violence, a cursory view of this literature indicates that some sociological perspectives are now being included in the attempt to understand more fully the phenomena of violence in the family. (See Star, 1980, and Straus, 1974, for assessments as to why the late entry of sociology.)

Keywords

Child Abuse Family Violence Battered Woman Sociological Perspective Symbolic Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl A. Bersani
    • 1
  • Huey-Tsyh Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyThe University of AkronAkronUSA

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