Research Issues Concerning Family Violence

  • Robert Geffner
  • Alan Rosenbaum
  • Honore Hughes

Abstract

After decades of professional inattention and neglect, the area of family violence has received substantial publicity in recent years, and more research is being conducted now than ever before. Several factors have contributed both to the inattention and to the burgeoning interest. Researchers in this area come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, sociology, criminology, medicine, law, and others. Communication between these fields has been inadequate, conceptual schemata and research strategies are often divergent, and there is sometimes competition between the professions. As a consequence, numerous inconsistencies in methodology, results, and interpretation have emerged, and these contribute to the confusion regarding the etiology and demography of family violence.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Family Violence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alessi, J. J., and Hearn, K. (1984). Group treatment of children in shelters for battered women. In A. R. Roberts (Ed.), Battered women and their families: Intervention strategies and treatment programs (pp. 49–62 ). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  2. Altemeier, W. A., O’Connor, S., Vietze, P., Sandler, H., and Sherrod, K. (1984). Prediction of child abuse: A prospective study of feasibility. Child Abuse and Neglect, 8, 393–400.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barrett, C. L., Hampe, I. E., and Miller, L. (1978). Research on psychotherapy with children. In S. L. Garfield and A. E. Bergin (Eds.), Handbook of psychotherapy and behavior change: An empirical analysis ( 2nd ed., pp. 411–436 ). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  4. Bauer, D. M., and Twentyman, C. T. (1984). Abusing, neglectful, and comparison mothers’ responses to childrelated and non-child-related stressors. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 53, 335–343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Beck, S., Collins, L., Overholser, J., and Terry, K. (1984). A comparison of children who receive and who do not receive permission to participate in research. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 12, 473–580.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Belsky, J. (1980). Child maltreatment; An ecological integration. American Psychologist, 35, 320–335.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Besharov, D. J. (1981). Toward better research on child abuse and neglect: Making definitional issues an explicit methodological concern. Child Abuse and Neglect, 5, 383–390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bousha, D. M., and Twentyman, C. T. (1984). Mother—child interactional style in abuse, neglect, and control groups: Naturalistic observations in the home. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 93, 106–114.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Brown, A. J., Pelcovitz, D., and Kaplan, S. (August, 1983 ). Child witnesses of family violence: A study ofpsychological correlates. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Anaheim, CA.Google Scholar
  10. Carlson, B. E. (1984). Children’s observations of interparental violence. In A. R. Roberts (Ed.), Battered women and their families: Intervention strategies and treatment programs (pp. 147–167 ). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  11. Crittenden, P. M. (1984). Sibling interaction: Evidence of a generational effect in maltreating infants. Child Abuse and Neglect, 8, 433–438.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Dalton, D. A., and Kantner, J. E. (1983). Aggression in battered and non-battered women as reflected in the hand test. Psychological Reports, 53, 703–709.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Department of Health and Human Services. (1983). Additional Protection for children involved as subjects in research. Federal Register, 48, 9814–9820.Google Scholar
  14. Egeland, B., Sroufe, L. A., and Erickson, M. (1983). The developmental consequence of different patterns of maltreatment. Child Abuse and Neglect, 7, 459–469.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Elbow, M. (1982). Children of violent marriages: The forgotten victims. Social Casework, 63, 465–471.Google Scholar
  16. Emery, R. E., Kraft, S. P., Joyce, S., and Shaw, D. (August, 1984). Children of abused women: Adjustment at three months follow-up. In H. M. Hughes (Chair), Impact of marital and family violence on children in shelters. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto.Google Scholar
  17. Emery, R. E., and O’Leary, K. D. (1984). Marital discord and child behavior problems in a nonclinic sample. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 12, 411–420.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Finkelhor, D. (1985). Child sexual abuse. New York: The Free Press/Macmillan.Google Scholar
  19. Finkelhor, D., and Hotaling, G. T. (1984). Sexual abuse in the National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect: An appraisal. Child Abuse and Neglect, 8, 23–33.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Frank, P. B., and Houghton, B. D. (1982). Confronting the batterer: A guide to creating the spouse abuse workshop. New York: Volunteer Counseling Services of Rockland County.Google Scholar
  21. Gabinet, L. (1983). Child abuse treatment failures reveal need for redefinition of the problem. Child Abuse and Neglect, 7, 395–402.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Geffner, R., Franks, D., Patrick, J. R., and Mantooth, C. (August, 1986). Reducing marital violence: A family therapy approach. In R. A. Geffner (Chair), New approaches for reducing family violence. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  23. Geffner, R. A., Jordan, K., Hicks, D., and Cook, S. K. (August, 1985). Psychological characteristics of violent couples. In R. A. Geffner (Chair), Violent couples: Current research and new directions for family psychologists. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.Google Scholar
  24. Gellen, M. L., Hoffman, R. A., Jones, M., and Stone, M. (1984). Abused and nonabused women: MMPI profile differences. Personnel and Guidance Journal, 62, 601–604.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Geller, J., and Wasserstrom, J. (1984). Conjoint therapy for the treatment of domestic violence. In A. R. Roberts (Ed.), Battered women and their families: Intervention strategies and treatment programs (pp. 33–48 ). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  26. Gelles, R. J. (1976). Abused wives: Why do they stay. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 38, 659–668. Gelles, R. J. (1982). Toward better research on child abuse and neglect: A response to Besharov. Child Abuse and Neglect, 6, 495–496.Google Scholar
  27. Gentry, C. E., and Eaddy, V. B. (1980). Treatment of children in spouse abusive families. Victimology: An International Journal, 5, 240–250.Google Scholar
  28. Giaretto, H. (1981). A comprehensive child sexual abuse treatment program. Child Abuse and Neglect, 5, 263–278.Google Scholar
  29. Goldberg, W. G., and Tomlanovich, M. C. (1984). Domestic violence in the Emergency Department: New findings. Journal of the American Medical Association, 251, 3259–3264.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Green, A. H., Power, E., Steinbook, B., and Gaines, R. (1981). Factors associated with successful and unsuccessful intervention with child abusive families. Child Abuse and Neglect, 5, 45–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Herman, J., and Hirschman, L. (1981). Father-daughter incest. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Hershey, D. (April, 1982). Domestic violence: Children reared in explosive homes. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Baltimore, MD.Google Scholar
  32. Hershorn, M., and Rosenbaum, A. (1985). Children of marital violence: A closer look at the unintended victims. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 55, 260–266.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Hilberman, E., and Munson, K. (1978). Sixty battered women. Victimology: An International Journal, 3, 460471.Google Scholar
  34. Hoffman-Plotkin, D., and Twentyman, C. J. (1984). A multimodal assessment of behavioral and cognitive deficits in abused and neglected preschoolers. Child Development, 55, 794–802.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Hughes, H. M. (1982). Brief interventions with children in a battered women’s shelter: A model preventive program. Family Relations, 31, 495–502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Hughes, H. M., and Barad, S. J. (1983). Psychological functioning of children in shelters for battered women: A preliminary investigation. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 53, 525–531.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Hughes, H. M., and Hampton, K. L. (August, 1984). Relationships between the affective functioning of mothers and their children. In H. M. Hughes (Chair), Impact of marital and family violence on children in shelters. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto.Google Scholar
  38. Hughes, H. M., Rau, T. J., Hampton, K. L., and Sablatura, B. (August, 1985). Effects of family violence on child victims and witnesses. In M. Rosenberg (Chair). Mediating factors in adjustment of child witnesses to family violence. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.Google Scholar
  39. Jason, J. (1984). Centers for Disease Control and the epidemiology of violence. Child Abuse and Neglect, 8, 279–382.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Jouriles, E. N., and O’Leary, K. D. (1985). Interspousal reliability of reports of marital violence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 53, 419–421.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Keller, H. R., and Erne, D. (1983). Child abuse: Toward a comprehensive model. In A. P. Goldstein (Ed.), Prevention and control of aggression (pp. 1–36 ). New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  42. Kendall, P. C., and Norton-Ford, J. D. (1982). Therapy outcome research methods. In P. C. Kendall and J. N. Butcher (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in clinical psychology (pp. 429–460 ). New York: WileyInterscience.Google Scholar
  43. Kercher, G. A., and McShane, M. (1984). The prevalence of child sexual abuse victimization in an adult sample of Texas residents. Child Abuse and Neglect, 8, 495–501.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Kinard, E. M. (1985). Ethical issues in research with abused children. Child Abuse and Neglect, 9, 301–311. Klein, D. (1982) The problem of multiple perception in families. Unpublished manuscript, University of Notre Dame.Google Scholar
  45. Kraft, S. P., Sullivan-Hanson, J., Christopoulos, C., Cohn, D. A., and Emery, R. A. (August, 1984 ). Spouse abuse: Its impact on children’s psychological adjustment. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto.Google Scholar
  46. Kroth, J. E. (1979). Child sexual abuse: Analysis of a family therapy approach. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.Google Scholar
  47. Krugman, R. D. (1985). The coming decade: Unfinished tasks and new frontiers. Child Abuse and Neglect, 9, 119–121.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. LaBell, L. S. (1979). Wife abuse: A sociological study of battered women and their mates. Victimology: An International Journal, 4, 258–267.Google Scholar
  49. Lahey, B. B., Conger, R. D., Atkeson, B. M., and Treiber, F. A. (1984). Parenting behavior and emotional status of physically abusive mothers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 1062–1071.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Leventhal, J. M. (1982). Research strategies and methodologic standards in studies of risk factors for child abuse. Child Abuse and Neglect, 6, 113–123.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Margolin, G., John, R., Gleferman, L., Miller, C., and Reynold, N. (August, 1985). Abusive and nonabusive couples’ affective responses to conflictual discussions. In R. A. Geffner (Chair), Violent couples; Current research and new directions for family psychologists. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.Google Scholar
  52. Martin, J. (1983). Maternal and paternal abuse of children: Theoretical and research perspectives. In D. Finkelhor, R. J. Gelles, G. T. Hotaling, and M. A. Straus, (Eds.), The dark side offamilies: Current family violence research (pp. 293–304 ). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  53. McClelland, R. W., and Battle, S. F. (1984). Applying social epidemiology to child abuse. Social Casework, 65, 212–218.Google Scholar
  54. Meiselman, K. C. (1980). Personality characteristics of incest history psychotherapy patients: A research note. Archives of Social Behavior, 9, 195–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Milner, J. S., Gold, R. G., Ayoub, C., and Jacewitz, M. M. (1984). Predictive validity of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 879–884.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Mrazek, P. B., and Mrazek, D. A. (1981). The effects of child sexual abuse: Methodological considerations. In P. B. Mrazek, and C. H. Kempe (Eds.), Sexually abused children and their families (pp. 235–245 ). New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  57. Murphy, S., Orkow, B., and Nicola, R. M. (1985). Prenatal prediction of child abuse and neglect: A prospective study. Child Abuse and Neglect, 9, 225–235.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. (1981). Study Findings: National Study of the Incidence and Severity of Child Abuse and Neglect. DHHS Pub. #(OHDS) 81–30325, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  59. Plotkin, R. C., Azar, S., Twentyman, C. T., and Perri, M. G. (1981). A critical evaluation of the research methodology employed in the investigation of causative factors of child abuse and neglect. Child Abuse and Neglect, 5, 449–455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Polansky, N. A., Gaudin, J. M., Ammons, P. W., and Davis, K. B. (1985). The psychological ecology of the neglectful mother. Child Abuse and Neglect, 9, 265–274.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Porter, B., and O’Leary, K. D. (1980). Marital discord and childhood behavior problems. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 8, 287–295.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Post, R. D., Willett, A. B., Franks, R. D., House, R. M., and Back, S. M. (1982). Childhood exposure to violence among victims and perpetrators of spouse battering. Victimology: An International Journal, 6, 156–166.Google Scholar
  63. Rivara, F. P. (1985). Physical abuse in children under two: A study of therapeutic outcomes. Child Abuse and Neglect, 9, 81–87.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Rosenbaum, A., and O’Leary, K. D. (1981). Children: The unintended victims of marital violence. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 51, 692–699.Google Scholar
  65. Rosenbaum, A., and O’Leary, K. D. (1986). Treatment of marital violence. In N. Jacobson, and A. Gurman (Eds.), Clinical handbook of marital therapy ( 385–405 ). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  66. Rosenberg, M. S. (August, 1984). Intergenerational family violence: A critique and implications for witnessing children. In H. M. Hughes (Chair), Impact of marital and family violence on children in shelters. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto.Google Scholar
  67. Rosewater, L. (August, 1984). MMPI patterns of abused wives. Paper presented at the Second Family ViolenceGoogle Scholar
  68. Research Conference, Durham, NH.Google Scholar
  69. Rounsaville, B. J. (1978). Battered wives-Barriers to identification and treatment. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 48, 487–494.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Russell, D. E. H. (1983). The incidence and prevalence of intrafamilial and extrafamilial sexual abuse of female children. Child Abuse and Neglect, 7, 133–146.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Russell, D. E. H. (1984). The prevalence and seriousness of incestuous abuse: Stepfathers vs. biological fathers. Child Abuse and Neglect, 8, 15–22.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Sablatura, B. (1985). Mediating variables in the short-and long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Unpublished master’s thesis. University of Arkansas.Google Scholar
  73. Smetana, J. G., Kelly, M., and Twentyman, C. J. (1984). Abused, neglected, and nonmaltreated children’s conceptions of moral and social-conventional transgressions. Child Development, 55, 277–287.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Smith, J. E. (1984). Non-accidental injury to children-I: A review of behavioral interventions. Behavioral Research and Therapy, 22, 331–347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Smith, J. E., and Rachman, S. J. (1984). Non-accidental injury to children-II: A controlled evaluation of a behavioral management programme. Behavioral Research and Therapy, 22, 349–366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Smith, J. E., Rachman, S. J., and Yule, B. (1984). Non-accidental injury to children-III: Methodological problems of evaluative treatment research. Behavioral Research and Therapy, 22, 367–383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Smith, S. L. (1984). Significant research findings in the etiology of child abuse. Social Casework, 65, 337–346. Snyder, D. K., and Fruchtman, L. A. (1981). Differential patterns of wife abuse: A data-based typology. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 49, 878–885.Google Scholar
  78. Straus, M. A. (1979). Measuring intrafamily conflict and violence: The Conflict Tactics Scales. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 41, 75–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Straus, M. A., Gelles, R. J., and Steinmetz, S. K. (1980). Behind closed doors: Violence in the American family. New York: Anchor Press/Doubleday.Google Scholar
  80. Szinovacz, M. E. (1983). Using couple data as a methodological tool: The case of marital violence. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 45, 633–644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Tasi, M., Feldman-Summers, S., and Edgar, M. (1979). Child molestation: Variables related to differential impacts on psychosexual functioning in adult women. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 88, 407–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Teich, C. F., and Lindquist, C. U. (1984). Violent versus nonviolent couples: A comparison of patterns. Psychotherapy, 21, 242–248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Tierney, K. J., and Corwin, D. L. (1983). Exploring intrafamilial child sexual abuse: A systems approach. In D. Finkelhor, R. J. Gelles, G. T. Hotaling, and M. A. Straus (Eds.), The dark side of families: Current family violence research (pp. 102–116 ). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  84. Walker, L. E. (1979). The battered woman. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  85. Walker, L. E. (1983). Victimology and the psychological perspectives of battered women. Victimology: An International Journal, 8, 82–104.Google Scholar
  86. Walker, L. E. (1984). The battered woman syndrome. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  87. Webster-Stratton, C. (1985). Comparison of abusive and nonabusive families with conduct-disordered children. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 55, 59–69.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Wodarski, J. S. (1981). Treatment of parents who abuse their children: A literature review and implications for professionals. Child Abuse and Neglect, 5, 351–360.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Wolfe, D. A., Jaffe, P. J., Wilson, S., and Zak, L. (August, 1984). Impact of family violence upon children’s adjustment. In H. M. Hughes (Chair), Impact of marital and family violence upon children in shelters. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto.Google Scholar
  90. Wolfe, D. A., Zak, L., Wilson, S., and Jaffe, P. (1986). Child witnesses to violence between parents: Critical issues in behavioral and social adjustment. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 14, 95–104.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Geffner
    • 1
  • Alan Rosenbaum
    • 2
  • Honore Hughes
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Texas at TylerTylerUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

Personalised recommendations