Prevention of Wife Abuse

  • Andrea J. Sedlak

Abstract

Violence in the family takes many forms and has many victims. As treated in this volume, it includes physical violence and sexual abuse and is directed against children, adolescents, wives, husbands, elderly relatives, and siblings. Because there is no reason at present to assume that these various phenomena follow identical, or even substantially similar dynamics, the task of evaluating the current knowledge on prevention for all categories of family violence will be formidable, requiring a separate monograph or textbook in its own right. This chapter will not attempt to cover the full gamut of family violence but, like others in this volume, will instead focus on a single category of family violence—physical violence by men against women in cohabiting and/or conjugal relationships.

Keywords

Domestic Violence Family Violence Battered Woman Couple Therapy Conflict Tactic Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea J. Sedlak
    • 1
  1. 1.Westat, Inc.RockvilleUSA

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