A Case Study of Beef Production and Export in Uruguay

  • María I. Marshall
  • Michael Boland
  • Daniel Conforte
  • Deborah Cesar

Abstract

Uruguay has the world’s highest per capita consumption of beef and exports approximately 60 percent of its production. Therefore, it is important for this small country to respond to international consumer tastes and preferences. Uruguay’s ability to comply with regulations passed by the European Union (EU) on beef hormones and traceability has made it competitive in various markets. Uruguay also saw the opening of new markets previously unavailable to it when the country was declared free of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) by the World Organization for Animal Health in 1995. Uruguayan beef is produced under pasture grazing systems rather than feedlot operations such as those found in North America and the EU.

Keywords

Growth Hormone European Union Export Market Carcass Weight Beef Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • María I. Marshall
    • 1
  • Michael Boland
    • 1
  • Daniel Conforte
    • 2
  • Deborah Cesar
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural EconomicsKansas State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Universidad ORTMontevideoUruguay
  3. 3.Institute Plan AgropecuarioMontevideoUruguay

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