The Development of a Louisiana French Norm

  • Becky Brown
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

In traditional research on varieties of French in Louisiana, reference is often made both anecdotally and systematically to deviations from the French of France.2 This perspective is guided by the prescriptive lens of the time. From this view, the norm to follow is generated from France and the governing body from which to adopt language legislation is the French Academy. Any departure or variation from this norm is considered deviant, corrupt, and unpure.

Keywords

Minority Language Speech Community Standard Language French Language Creative Writer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Becky Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and Interdepartmental Program in LinguisticsPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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