The Louisiana French Movement

Actors and Actions in Social Change
  • Jacques Henry
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

Actions launched since 1968 for the preservation and development of the French language and culture in Louisiana have been collectively designated the French Movement. This term unites two different types of actors and actions. On one hand, the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana (CODOFIL) and its institutional allies promoted and implemented programs aimed at restoring a competence in French by teaching it as a second language. They have also worked at improving the legal and societal status of Cajun French (CF) language and culture by removing obstacles such as the constitutional ban of French and the “shame”of being Cajun and speaking the language. On the other hand, a number of bilingual Cajun activists have produced works and implemented actions aimed at reconstructing a culturally defined Louisiana French identity. Unorganized and having various trades and purposes (academics, musicians, entrepreneurs), these individuals have focused on the exploration of the Acadian past, the expansion of a musical and literary corpus, and the commercialization of the ethnic lifestyle of joie de vivre.

Keywords

Baton Rouge School Board French Language Ethnic Pride Popular Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacques Henry
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyUniversity of Southwestern LouisianaLafayetteUSA

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