Foundations in Cold Regions

  • Arvind Phukan
Chapter

Abstract

The design of foundations in cold regions differs significantly from that in temperate regions. Cold regions include both those areas with seasonal frost and perennially frozen ground (permafrost). On the basis of air temperature, snow depth, ice covers and permafrost, Bates and Bilello (1966) reported that about 48 percent of the northern hemisphere’s land mass is categorized as cold regions and the southern most reaches of discontinuous permafrost over land masses approximately follow the 40°N latitude line, as illustrated in Figure 19.1. In cold regions, the upper soil layer, or active layer, experiences cycles of winter freezing and summer thawing.

Keywords

Freeze Soil Cold Region Ground Temperature Shallow Foundation Freeze Ground 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andersland, O. B. and Anderson, D. M. (eds.) (1978), Geotechnical Engineering for Cold Regions, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York, N.Y.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson, D. M. and Morgenstern, N. R. (1973), Physics, chemistry, and mechanics of frozen ground, North American Contribution, Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Permafrost, Yakutsk, USSR, National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C., pp. 257–288.Google Scholar
  3. Anderson, D. M. and Tice, A. R. (1973), The unfrozen interfacial phase in frozen soil systems, Ecological Studies, 4, pp. 197–125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Assure, A. (1963), Discussion on creep of frozen soils, North American Contribution, Proceedings of the First International Conference on Permafrost, Lafayette, Indiana, National Academy of Sciences Publication 1287, pp. 339-340.Google Scholar
  5. Baranov, I. J. and Kudryavtsev, V. A. (1966), Permafrost in eurasia, Proceedings of the First International Conference on Permafrost, Lafayette, Indiana, National Academy of Sciences Publication 1287, pp. 98-102.Google Scholar
  6. Bates, R. E. and Billello, M. A. (1966), Defining the Cold Regions of the Northern Hemisphere, U.S. Army CRREL Technical Report 178.Google Scholar
  7. Brown, R. J. E. (1967), Permafrost in Canada, National Research Council, Canada, Map 1246A.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Carslaw, H. S. and Jaeger, J. C. (1959), Conduction of Heat in Solids, 2d ed., Oxford University Press, London.Google Scholar
  9. Di Pasquale, L., Gerlek, S., and Phukan, A. (1983), Design and construction of pile foundations in Yukon-Kuskokwim delta, Alaska, Fourth International Conference on Permafrost, Fairbanks.Google Scholar
  10. Holtz, R. D. and Kovacs, W. D. (1981), An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., p. 733.Google Scholar
  11. Huit, J. A. H. (1966), Creep in Engineering Structures, Blaisdell, Waltham, Mass.Google Scholar
  12. Johnston, G. H. (1981), Permafrost: Engineering Design and Construction, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.Google Scholar
  13. Kersten, M. S. (1949), Thermal Properties of Soils, University of Minnesota, Engineering Experiment Station, Bulletin 28.Google Scholar
  14. Lambe, T. W. and Whitman, R. V. (1979), Soil Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.Google Scholar
  15. Lunardini, V. J. (1981), Heat Transfer in Cold Climate, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, N.Y.Google Scholar
  16. Morgenstern, N. R. and Nixon, J. F. (1971), One-dimensional consolidation of thawing soils, Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 8, No. 4, pp. 448–565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Morgenstern, N. R., Roggensack, W. D., and Weaver, J. S. (1980), The behavior of friction piles in ice and ice-rich soils, Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 17, pp. 405–415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Pewe, T. L. (1966), Ice-wedges in Alaska: Classification, distribution, and climatic significance, Proceedings of the First International Conference on Permafrost, Lafayette, Indiana, National Academy of Sciences Publication 1287, pp. 76-81.Google Scholar
  19. Phukan, A. (1977), Pile foundation in frozen soils, ASME Energy Technology Conference, Houston, Texas.Google Scholar
  20. Phukan, A. (1980), Design of deep foundations in discontinuous permafrost, ASCE Spring Convention, Technical Session on Deep Foundations, Portland, Oregon.Google Scholar
  21. Phukan, A. (1981), Design Guide for Roadways on Permafrost, State of Alaska, Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Division of Planning and Program Research Section, Fairbanks.Google Scholar
  22. Phukan, A. (1985), Frozen Ground Engineering, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J.Google Scholar
  23. Tsytovich, N. A. (1975), The Mechanics of Frozen Ground, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York, N.Y.Google Scholar
  24. Vyalov, S. S. (1959), Rheological Properties and Bearings Capacity of Soils, U.S. Army CRREL, Translation 74 (1965).Google Scholar
  25. Vyalov, S. S. (1962), The strength and creep of frozen soils and calculations for ice-soil retaining structures, U.S. Army CRREL, Translation 76 (1965).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arvind Phukan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Alaska at AnchorageUSA

Personalised recommendations